The Last Thing Japan’s Lost Black Hole Satellite Saw Before It Died Proves Something MINDBLOWING!

Hitomi’s final observations (Image: Hitomi Collaboration/JAXA, NASA, ESA, SRON, CSA)

This remarkable image is the last thing Japan’s lost satellite, Hitomi, saw.

Despite the absolutely fascinating view of the Perseus Cluster — a galaxy cluster 240 million light years away that houses a supermassive black hole at its center — it has some paradigm shifting implications in relation to our understanding of the purpose black holes serve in galaxy formations.

“Black holes very effectively control the growth rate of galaxies.” – Brian McNamara

In an interview with Gizmodo, Professor Brian McNamara of the University of Waterloo told Gizmodo;

“The surprise is that it turns out that the energy being pumped out of the black hole is being very efficiently absorbed... This hot gas that we’re looking at with Hitomi is the stuff of the future, it’s the gas out of which galaxies form. There is much more of this hot gas than there are stars in the galaxy, or there’s more stuff that wasn’t made into galaxies than that was.”

What this basically means, is that black holes play a very important role in the creation and size of a galaxy.

“What it shows is that black holes very effectively control the growth rate of galaxies.".

What's happening here is black holes are giving off energy that are later transforming into galaxies. On the contrary however, as we already know, they are also consuming galaxies that already exist. This almost seems to be some type of cycle of death and life.

Although black holes are something we generally view with a type of discontent and fear, because of it's mind blowing ability to consume entire galaxies like a massive science fiction monster, it seems they give as much life (in the form of a galaxy) as they take. It's even possible that these black holes are where life comes from. But then the question begs to be asked, where do the black holes come from???

This should remind all of us, that we know very little about the Universe. Too often people pretend they have all the answers, whether they make these claims in the name of religion or science. The truth is we really don't know what's going on, so we should keep an open mind.

Below you can watch an incredible short video on how black holes are formed;

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Source: Gizmodo